Is there such a thing as a nocturnal monkey? Yes, and only in the New World tropics and they go by two different names, both of which are very fitting: the Owl Monkey or Night Monkey.

As much of the world turns its attention to Brazil for World Cup 2014, we’re looking at the iconic wildlife of the teams facing off. Our Round 1 match-up pits Chile’s guanaco, a favorite species observed on our Patagonia tours, against Australia’s iconic kangaroo. 


Chile: Guanaco

It takes less than 30 minutes to travel from Santa Marta to Minca, but the quaint little village in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta mountains feels like a world away from the city.

The Humboldt penguin is very similar in both size and appearance to the more southerly Magellanic penguin. When observed from the front, they are quite easily distinguished by looking at the dark chest band or bands depending on the species. The Humboldt penguin has a single black chest band on an otherwise white chest and belly whereas the Magellanic penguin has two black chest bands.

For any travelers journeying to the Peruvian Amazon, there are a couple of tree species that always attract a lot of attention: the enormous kapok trees and the much smaller and extremely more prevalent cecropias.

As part of our on-going partnership with the Peruvian NGO CONAPAC, International Expeditions employee Emily Harley-Reid traveled to Peru in April to participate in the Adopt-a-School program’s annual school supply distribution trip.

The International Galapagos Tour Operators Association (IGTOA), a group of conservation-minded ecotourism companies like International Expeditions, will contribute $65,000 to four organizations working on the front lines of Galapagos conservation. IE was a founding member of IGTOA and Emily Harley, a member of our marketing team, serves as vice president on the board.

galapagos-blue-footed-boobyAnyone who has traveled to the Galapagos Islands no doubt has dozens of “boudoir” photos of the comical blue-footed boobies and their distinct mating dance. But, according to a new study in Avian Conservation and Ecology, blue-footed boobies have been demonstrably less amorous since 1998 and their population numbers are in sharp decline.

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