Safaris

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Once thought to be a cross between a camel and a leopard, the giraffe is now a commonly recognized animal in its own right. However, spotting one on a Kenya and Tanzania safari is still a treat for nature enthusiasts.

The giraffe is the tallest living animal, measuring as high as 20 feet. Their long necks allow them to reach into trees to maintain their herbivorous diet, and their legs — usually measuring about six feet high — allow them to run at speeds of 35 miles per hour at a gallop.

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When booking a Kenya and Tanzania safari, most travelers will likely expect to spend a good deal of time exploring the majestic animals that populate Serengeti National Park. While more prominent animals like lions and elephants may be bigger draws, there are hundreds of lesser-known species populating the region that can be just as compelling. Animal lovers will delight in studying peaceful herbivorous creatures like antelope, including native topi, while exploring the Serengeti.

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There is no shortage of amazing attractions on a Kenya and Tanzania safari, yet few capture the might and majesty of the natural world quite as soundly as the Ngorongoro Crater in northern Tanzania.

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When one's nature travel plans lead them to Tanzania, a safari is almost certainly on their mind. Some travelers also devote time during their Kenya and Tanzania safari taking in landmarks that dot the nation. For vacationers who want to marvel at both the local wildlife and natural wonders of Tanzania, a stop at Olduvai Gorge is a must.

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Few locations in the world allow as many opportunities to be wowed by the power and majesty of the natural world as the East Africa's Uganda. The “Pearl of Africa” is home to a vast array of natural treasures and an impressive biodiversity, much of which can be seen in Murchison Falls National Park.

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For many vacationers interested in travel to Kenya, a safari is the quintessential African experience. That’s because these once-in-a-lifetime journeys allow travelers to witness both the epic beauty of the African countryside and the majestic grace of some of the most beautiful animals on the planet.

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During the last century, Africa's black rhino population plummeted by more than 90 percent, reaching an alarming low of just 2,300, but five were recently returned to the Serengeti National Park as part of an ambitious initiative to boost the viability of Tanzania's rhino population.

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