From Our Guests

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In January 2013, Jim Smith joined IE to travel to Cuba. Jim commemorated his experience with a series of haikus, which he has graciously agreed to share.

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In January, Jim Smith joined IE to travel to Cuba. Jim commemorated his experience with a series of haikus, which he has graciously agreed to share. Read other entries here

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While part of IE's Cuba travel program in January, Jim Smith wrote a series of poems about his experience. Read other poems in the series here.

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In January, Jim Smith joined IE to travel to Cuba. Jim commemorated his experience with a series of haikus, which he has graciously agreed to share. Read other entries here.

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Everyone at IE loves hearing feedback from our guests! And while many travelers know that they'll love the wildlife and landscapes they encounter on one of our adventures, it is most often the staff who earns the highest praise. So it was no surprise when Februrary 22, 2013 Galapagos Islands cruise guests Mary & Giff Ewing shared this note about how much they were touched by the naturalist guides and crew aboard the M/V Evolution.

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In January, Jim Smith joined IE to travel to Cuba. Jim commemorated his experience with a series of poems, which he has graciously agreed to share. Read other entries here.

flitting branch to branch
sipping nectar ceaselessly
rare “bee hummingbird”

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Jim Smith, a guest who joined IE to travel to Cuba in January 2013 commemorated his experience with a series of poems, which he has graciously agreed to share. Read his first piece here.

creatures of the night
hanging bats’, screech owls’ abode
cavern depths disclose 


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Jim Smith, a guest on IE's people-to-people Cuba travel program in January 2013 commemorated his experience with a series of poems, which he has graciously agreed to share.
 

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Participants on IE's people-to-people Cuba experience travel to this orchid garden in Soroa. Through our interaction with the garden’s keepers, guests not only learn about endemic species, but more importantly, the relationship between Cubans and land. The most interesting story of course, involved the story of how Cuban women once used the national flower – mariposa – to relay secret messages. During the Cuban fight to overthrow the Spanish, Cuban women would wear the mariposa in their hair.

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