Nicaragua

Up in the cloud forest, near the northern Nicaraguan city of Matagalpa, sits a private nature reserve dating back over 120 years. Selva Negra (which translates to “The Black Forest”) was founded in the late 1800s by German-born immigrants who were encouraged to settle the area by the Nicaraguan government. The 300-acre reserve is home to a wild array of flora and fauna, as well as one of the country's most prestigious coffee plantations.

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Although the country of Nicaragua may not be as high-profile as its neighbors in Latin America, this land boasts some of the most diverse wildlife on the planet, making it an animal lover's paradise. If you're looking for a country where you can glimpse sea turtles on the beach one minute and spot monkeys in the jungle the next, Nicaragua is the place for you.

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Welcome to Lake Nicaragua. When it comes to Latin America, you probably think raging rivers and large ocean bodies like the Caribbean Sea and the Pacific Ocean. However, while both of these oceans are an important part of the coastline of Nicaragua, Lake Nicaragua exists as the country's largest lake and one of the most unique lakes in Central America.

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Southern Nicaragua's Mombacho Volcano is unmistakeable. Wherever you seem to turn, there it is hovering over the landscape. Whether it's walking the streets of Granada, taking a panoramic photograph from the top of Iglesia de la Merced, or boating around Lake Granada, Mombacho captures your attention. And that with Mombacho not even being one of Nicaragua's tallest volcanoes, at just below 4,500 feet. However, for the outdoor adventurist, Mombacho has a lot to offer.

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