Eco Travel

Black rhinos are gentle giants — herbivores who do not kill except in self-defense. Seeing them amble around the savannah in search of roots and grasses to chew on or water to drink is a quintessential African experience. Sadly, it’s an experience that our grandchildren may never have, as black rhinos (alongside their white and Asian cousins) are critically endangered and increasingly under threat.

Ninety-eight percent. That's the number you’ll read or hear about as you prepare for tracking gorillas in Uganda. In 2012, after four years of research, geneticists from the U.K.'s Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute published a study declaring a 98% overlap between the human and gorilla genomes. "Most of our genes are very similar, or even identical to, the gorilla version of the same gene," said a researcher.
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Through the generosity of IE guests Kathleen Egan and Eleanor Morpheu, this summer every family and school room in the small village of Cedro Isla, Peru was given a Sawyer point-of-use water filtration system. This was also the first time this village has participated in the Adopt-a-School Program, which IE has long-supported through our involvement with CONAPAC.

It takes less than 30 minutes to travel from Santa Marta to Minca, but the quaint little village in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta mountains feels like a world away from the city.

As part of our on-going partnership with the Peruvian NGO CONAPAC, International Expeditions employee Emily Harley-Reid traveled to Peru in April to participate in the Adopt-a-School program’s annual school supply distribution trip.

The International Galapagos Tour Operators Association (IGTOA), a group of conservation-minded ecotourism companies like International Expeditions, will contribute $65,000 to four organizations working on the front lines of Galapagos conservation. IE was a founding member of IGTOA and Emily Harley, a member of our marketing team, serves as vice president on the board.

The Amazon rainforest is one of the most biologically diverse regions of the world, but the delicate balance of the ecosystem is threatened every day by deforestation and industrialization. The ever-changing climate may also present issues when it comes to preserving the rainforests, but indigenous people living in the Amazon are adjusting their practices to accommodate the changes.

This week’s travel inspiration comes courtesy of Outside magazine founder Tim Cahill. Over the past 33 years, International Expeditions has learned that some of the most enriching part of our small-group tours is the people our guests meet along the road – from our guides to the warm, welcoming locals who invite us into their homes and lives every week.

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It is Endangered Species Day and we’re turning our focus to some of the critically engendered wildlife that you may spot on International Expeditions’ nature-focused journeys. We hope that by seeing wildlife in its precious habitat, you’ll be inspired to protect and improve the world we share.

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When nature travel enthusiasts head to Brazil, they are usually Amazon-bound, looking for the famous wildlife that the massive rainforest and river have to offer. However fascinating travel on the Amazon can be, the Pantanal in Brazil is perhaps a better place to see wildlife.

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