Borneo

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Although nature travel to the island of Borneo can allow visitors to see beautiful turquoise waters and hundreds of technicolor birds in the sky, venturing underground gives explorers a whole new world to discover. According to Bat Conservation International, the island is home to more than 100 species of bats, many of which live in the vast cave system there.

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The Sambas stream toad, also known as the Bornean rainbow toad, as spent years on the Conservation International list of “Most Wanted Lost Frogs,” and many feared this colorful species was extinct. In fact, it had been so long since scientists had spotted these spindly legged creatures — 1924 was the last known sighting — that only illustrations of the toads existed. That was until June 13, 2011, when scientists spotted three Bornean rainbow toads on a night search in the remote Sarawak region.

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A species of otter that has not been seen in Malaysia for more than 100 years, was recently seen in a photograph snapped on Borneo and has raised hopes that there's still time to save the creature. The photograph was taken in Malaysia's Sabah state in the second half of 2008, but international scientists needed nearly two years to study it before confirming it was indeed the hairy-nosed otter.

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