Amazon River

Blog posts about International Expeditions' Amazon River cruises
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Travelers with a passion for primates will find a wealth of these creatures in the Amazon River basin. Although the vast biodiversity of the region means that there are countless locations in which to spy these mammals, there may be no better destination to get up and close with these distant ancestors of man than the Pacaya-Samiria Reserve in northern Peru.

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Today’s insider’s travel tip comes to you courtesy of our Creative Services Editor, Emily, who loves checking out the cities she visits on foot.

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An Amazon cruise allows travelers to glimpse a number of unique and beautiful animals during their excursion, but that is a perk not solely reserved for the river proper. The 1,200-mile long Rio Ucayali is one of the many offshoots of the complex river system, and offers a wealth of wildlife both along its shores and in its waters.

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Those who come to the vast Amazon rainforest to learn about the jungle’s natural bounty of medicinal plants often encounter a complex combination of medicine and spiritual ritual administered by a local Shaman. While sometimes overlooked by those studying modern medicine, the Amazon’s medicinal plants and Shamans provide a vital link between nature’s ecosystems, ancient medicine and modern cures.

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As loggers, farmers and builders clear more and more patches of forest, the reproductive efforts of trees in the Amazon rainforest are being helped out by tambaqui, a fruit-eating species of fish.

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A quick survey of our Travel Planners has uncovered the most popular question they get about our Amazon tour: When is the best time to go?

In truth, though it may sound cliche, there really is no bad time to visit the Amazon River; however, your personal preferences and activities will play a big part in choosing which time of the year you should take an Amazon cruise.

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Scientists have just discovered two new species of fresh water stingrays in the Amazon rainforest near the port city of Iquitos, Peru. These two stingray species both look like pancakes with noses. The two "pancake" species belong to the first new stingray genus found in the Amazon region in more than two decades. They also represent just the fourth neotropical stingray genera. In addition to their pancake-like appearance, both rays are big, have slits on their bellies and a tiny spine on their tails.

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For the past seven years, Travel + Leisure readers and our guests have named IE one of the "World’s Best" Tour Operators and Safari Outfitters! To qualify for the awards, tour operators were judged on six criteria: staff/guides, itineraries/destinations, activities, accommodations, food and value — everything that goes into creating the experience of a lifetime for you!

February 04, 2011

Authentic Pisco Sour Recipe

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Saturday marks National Pisco Sour Day in Peru. Pisco, a clear, fermented brandy has been distilled from fresh musts of Muscat grapes in copper alembic stills since the Spanish conquest, and is considered part of Peru's cultural heritage. This liqueur is also the national spirit of Chile, although each country has a distinct history and uses Pisco for different cocktails.

January 25, 2011

My "Amazon Moment"

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IE employees LOVE getting out of the office and traveling. Creative Services Editor Emily Harley shares memories from her Amazon River expedition aboard La Amatista.

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