Amazon River

Blog posts about International Expeditions' Amazon River cruises
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While much of the Western world has shed the religious associations of Halloween in favor of focusing on pranks, costumes and copious amounts of candy, as you travel around the globe you can find a number of fascinating ways to celebrate one of the world’s oldest holidays.

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Researchers from Case Western Reserve University recently found the oldest fossils on the South American continent along the banks of the Ucayali River, an offshoot of the Amazon River.

The fossils, which are at least 41 million years old, are the teeth of mouse and rat-sized animals that experts say are most closely related to African rodents. They are from the suborder Caviomorpha, which means they are related to living species such as guinea pigs, chinchillas and New World porcupines.

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Brazilian scientists reported finding a new river in the Amazon basin that they estimate is the same length but nearly 100 times as wide, The Guardian reports. Lead researchers Valiya Hamza and Elizabeth Tavares Pimentel of Brazil's National Observatory presented their findings at the International Congress of the Society Brasiliera Geophysical in Rio de Janeiro.

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 While the Amazon River may be home to larger aquatic animals, piranhas are perhaps some of the best-known residents — primarily for the lore associate with their sharp teeth and voracious appetites.

Travelers who venture into a tributary with slower-moving waters on International Expeditions’ Amazon River cruise will likely find red-bellied, white or black piranhas. Of these three species, the red-bellied variety had the strongest jaws and sharpest teeth of all of these carnivorous fish.

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Eco-travel has been allowing vacationers to explore the world in search of natural beauty and unspoiled wilderness for years, and though some travelers have their heart set on scenic vistas and natural formations, others are searching to commune with some of the native wildlife in these distant regions. If rare and exotic animals are at the top of your "must-see" list, then an Amazon River cruise will be right up your alley.

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Travelers on Amazon River cruises don't need to listen closely to hear the low, rumbling growl of red howler monkeys. Aptly named, these primates, native to Central and South America, can be heard up to three miles away.

August 03, 2011

Amazon River Birding List

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Are you an avid birder? Guests on our Amazon River cruise have discovered this journey is a "MUST" for any nature enthusiast! Accompanied by our seasoned naturalist guides, a recent departure compiled this impressive list of species. Be sure to click here for the full species list.

 

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Birders have long explored the Amazon River and its tributaries, as theses waterways are home to a diverse collection of avian species, many of which are rarely glimpsed outside of the region.

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Salt mined in Maras, Peru, just north of Cusco, has always been popular among the Andean people, but markets as far away as Switzerland, Japan and the Philippines are now demanding the special mineral.

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Satellite images and flights over the western Amazon River recently revealed a previously unknown indigenous group existing there, National Geographic reports.

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