Amazon River

Blog posts about International Expeditions' Amazon River cruises
Blog Image

The Northern horned screamer is a large bird that doesn’t quite fit in with other species…in fact; there are only three species in their family Anhimidae. Northern horned screamers live in aquatic areas with lots of emergent vegetation and when walking on water lettuce or hyacinth, look like a very large goose.  Their feet, however are not webbed, but they have fairly heavy long toes that support their weight on the floating mats of vegetation. 

Blog Image

You already know that International Expeditions’ Amazon River cruises are a great way to connect with nature, but the experts at Travel + Leisure say it is also a prime spot to get over being “suddenly single.”

May 06, 2013

Beware of the Boto?

Blog Image

The enigmatic pink river dolphin, aka Boto, of the Amazon and Orinoco Rivers is an aquatic creature that many guests to the region can’t wait to observe. Most guests on IE’s Amazon River cruises do not come away disappointed as these lovely creatures are fairly abundant in many areas of the Peruvian Amazon.

Blog Image

The green iguana is one of the iconic species of the neotropical rainforest. This species has an extensive range stretching from Northern Central America southward throughout the Amazon Basin. They’ve also been introduced in South Florida, as well as the lower Rio Grande area of South Texas. Green iguanas are the largest lizard in the Amazon Basin, including the Peruvian Amazon, and large males may reach six feet in length. Females are considerably smaller, reaching about four feet in length. 

Blog Image

International Expeditions' Director of Operations Tara Ellison took a moment to check-in from Iquitos, Peru, where she is spending a week on our Amazon River cruise.

Blog Image

Leaf-mimic katydids are one of the marvelous designs of nature that IE guests typically observe during nocturnal walks on Amazon rainforest trails. These insects, which are comprised of a number of at least 13 different genera and over 100 species, have been described from Central and South America.

Blog Image

International Expeditions' Director of Operations Tara Ellison took a moment to check-in from Iquitos, Peru, where she is preparing to spend a week on our Amazon River cruise.

March 21, 2013

Piranha Do Not Eat People

Blog Image

The piranha conjures up all sorts of thoughts, many of which are based on movies, where piranhas consume anything that enters or falls into the water. Fortunately, this is not a usual circumstance and typically in the Amazon Basin, “People eat piranhas, piranhas do not eat people!” 

In free-flowing rivers and streams, piranha are incredibly abundant fishes, and although the red-breasted piranha appears to be the most abundant, there are also black piranha, white piranha and even the big fruit-eating pacu is a type of piranha. 

Syndicate content