Amazon River

Blog posts about International Expeditions' Amazon River cruises
Blog Image

Anyone who has visited the Charles Darwin Research Station in the Galapagos Islands has snapped a picture of Lonesome George and his equally lonesome lady companion tortoises. Now the Galapagos National Park has found five eggs laid by one of George's female companions.

Eggs laid last year turned out to be infertile, but we're holding out hope!

LEARN MORE

Blog Image

There is so much left to be discovered in our world, and science has just released two exciting findings relating to the Amazon River and its surrounding rainforest!

Amazon River 11 Million Years Old:

Geologists studying boreholes in the sediment at the mouth of the Amazon River say the river took its present shape approximately 2.4 million years ago. LEARN MORE

New Sub-Species of Monkey Found in Brazilian Amazon:

Blog Image

A quick survey of our Travel Planners has uncovered the most popular question they get about our Amazon tour: When is the best time to go?

In truth, though it may sound cliché, there really is no bad time to visit the Amazon River; however, your personal preferences and activities will play a big part in choosing which time of the year you should take an Amazon cruise.

Blog Image

By Amy Eldridge of Franklin, Kentucky

My trip to the Amazon was an event of a lifetime. Spending time with my daughter, getting lots of rest and exercise, eating healthy food I felt better than I have in ages. It was also good to get away from all the news media telling us how bad everything is and just enjoy the peace and quiet.

Blog Image

While drinking dirty river water might be better than having no water at all, International Expeditions believes that every person should have pure water, and the health and conservation benefits are enormous!

May 26, 2009

Taste of Travel: Peru

Blog Image

Peru is a surprising mixture of cultures and cuisines – including Spanish, African, Chinese and Europeans.  A true highlight of our Amazon River Voyage is the opportunity to sample the local fare, but even if you can’t be drifting down a river sipping a Pisco Sour, there’s no reason you can’t try these dishes at home!

Alfajores (Filled cookies with caramel)

Blog Image

The Amazon is an integration of rivers and jungles combined to form the largest wilderness area in the world — the Amazon Basin. Occupying over 2.5 million square miles and including major portions of nine South American countries, this area contains an enormous diversity and abundance of fauna and flora. Despite the hundreds of scientists who have explored the Amazon and the masses of data that have been compiled, most of its huge area is only vaguely known with thousands of new species waiting to be discovered.

Syndicate content