ietravel's blog

Blog Image

Pilgrims once flocked to the Egyptian island of Philae, coming from all over the ancient world to worship Isis, a goddess who is commemorated with a massive temple that was re-erected from beneath the Nile River. Isis was mysterious to most who worshipped her, but was believed to have healing powers for those who sought her counsel.

Blog Image

Strolling along the powdery, white sand of Cerro Brujo - one first stops on International Expeditions’ Galapagos Islands cruises - visitors can expect to spot blue-footed boobies and finches as they hop about on the beach. However, it is likely that the most memorable encounter they will have will be with a Galapagos sea lion.

"Swimming with the sea lions was one of the most unforgettable highlights of the Galapagos trip,” said recent Galapagos traveler John Newman.

Blog Image

Eco-travel has been allowing vacationers to explore the world in search of natural beauty and unspoiled wilderness for years, and though some travelers have their heart set on scenic vistas and natural formations, others are searching to commune with some of the native wildlife in these distant regions. If rare and exotic animals are at the top of your "must-see" list, then an Amazon River cruise will be right up your alley.

Blog Image

Each year, IE Production Manager Kelli Eldridge is charged with helping our staff create Environs, the quintessential guide to nature travel. The latest version will be in the mail on August 31, but you can get a sneak peek online here. Kelli took a few minutes to let us know what’s new for 2012.

Blog Image

Adventurers will find a wealth of exciting and mysterious artifacts on the path to the Incan city of Machu Picchu, and many of those are found in the great Urubamba Valley. Also known as the Sacred Valley of the Incas, the Urubamba Valley is a stronghold of Inca culture that offers those who travel to Machu Picchu a glimpse of what life for these ancient peoples must have been like.

Blog Image

Travelers on Amazon River cruises don't need to listen closely to hear the low, rumbling growl of red howler monkeys. Aptly named, these primates, native to Central and South America, can be heard up to three miles away.

Blog Image

There is a reason the sparkling shoreline of Turkey is called the Turquoise Coast. Not because of any abundance of a certain mineral, but rather for the bright green-blue of its Aegean and Mediterranean waters. However, an even more apt name for the area may be something that pays homage to its historical roots, as everything in the region — from its cliffs to its bays — is steeped in the history and culture of the Lycians, an ancient group of people who made history for their peaceful democratic societies and institutions.

Blog Image

Although many people visit the region for a Kenya and Tanzania safari, the lakes of Kenya have gotten more attention in the news lately. Lake Elementaita, Lake Bogoria and Lake Nakuru were named UNESCO World Heritage Sites in June.

Blog Image

The lush fields covering the mountainsides of Panama’s Chiriquí Highlands in Boquete are home to various forms of wildlife, including the sought-after resplendent quetzal, making nature travel through the countryside memorable for any wildlife or birding enthusiast. But they also produce one of the country's largest exports, a commodity that no traveler should pass by: coffee.

Blog Image

Though sites like Machu Picchu, the Great Pyramids of Egypt and Stonehenge may differ from one another in several ways, they are all bound by at least one similarity — distinction as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The prestigious title reflects these locations' unique positions as arbiters of the local culture and as a commanding physical significance for the area in which it is found.

Syndicate content