Scientists Discover World's Smallest Frogs in Papua New Guinea

January 19, 2012
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Perhaps the fact that the Paedophryne genus is made up of four of the 10 smallest frog species in the world is the reason it took scientists so long to discover two of them. The Paedrophryne amauensis and swiftorum, both found in Papua New Guinea, are the making headlines as the smallest frogs in the world. Discovery News reports that the amauensis is a mere 7.7 millimeters long and the swiftorum comes in at just over 8 mm.

"It was particularly difficult to locate Paedophryne amauensis due to its diminutive size and the males' high-pitched insect-like mating call," scientist Chris Austin from Louisiana State University, who discovered the tiny creatures, told Discovery News. It was once thought that diminutive frogs such as these newly-catalogued amphibians were only genetic oddities, but the discovery of more miniature frogs has many scientists convinced that they could well be a "previously unrecognized ecological guild."

If you are thinking about a Papua New Guinea tour for your next adventure, be sure to mind where you're going and tread lightly, as these little frogs love to spend their time hidden on the rainforest floor.


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