Breeding Success in Brazil's Pantanal

November 02, 2011
Blog Image

For 32 years, International Expeditions has been focused on preserving Earth’s wild regions…along with the creatures that call these environments home. So we’re thrilled to share news from Brazil’s Pantanal, where IE is heavily involved in trying to restore the native populations of macaws.

Araras Ecolodge, where guests stay during our Pantanal tour, has long worked to reintroduce native and endangered species — a big part of why we chose to work with them. They have a hyacinth macaw project to help the bird re-populate the northern Pantanal region, where the bird’s numbers have been dwindling due to habitat loss.

IE paid to have a nest built and hopefully attract some macaws to move in and start a family. These nests mimic holes and hallows in trees. Not only do the hyacinth macaws like the man-made nests but so do blue-fronted parrots, another species which nests in holes in trees.

We put the nest up just weeks ago and already a pair of blue-fronted parrots have moved in and laid eggs! The female laid three eggs, one of which Araras took and will care for/reintroduce through their conservation program, and the other two will be left with the adults to (hopefully) mature.

The blue-fronted parrot is a beautiful bird that sings and speaks extremely well, making it a highly sought-after pet. Illegal pet traders are putting tremendous stress on this species, though their population dynamics in the Pantanal are not fully known.