November 2010

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When International Expeditions' founders Richard Ryel and Steve Cox first dreamed of bringing curious wildlife enthusiasts to the Peruvian Amazon more than 30 years ago, they had no idea that their company would establish such deep roots in this remote corner of the Earth.

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Two rare ceramic pieces can now be returned to the Government of Peru following an agreement by the United States and a New York-based collector of Peruvian pre-Columbian antiquities on November 2. The settlement resulted from an investigation by the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Office of Homeland Security Investigations (HSI).

The Peruvian government considers the items part of the country's cultural patrimony and believes they were unlawfully exported.

November 12, 2010

Quick Photo Tips

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One of the best ways to preserve memories of your International Expeditions journey is with great photos! So we asked some of our favorite photographers for tips to get the best possible shots. If you are going to be shooting from an open jeep or vehicle,  there are a few things you can do to make sure you get the sharpest pictures.

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At International Expeditions, we're always thrilled to hear about the wonderful experiences our guests' had during their journeys. So, we were especially excited to read this poem written by Amazon Riverboat cruise  guest Lucy Allison!

We’ve had a week of wondrous sights
On Amatista with her crew.
Exciting days and peaceful nights,
And friendships made with all of you.

Each morning on the skiffs we went
In search of birds and mammals too.
So many happy hours were spent,

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What happens when Amazon cruise naturalists spot an anaconda along the riverbanks? Recent IE guest Kieth Chelm found out when he got an up-close and personal meeting with a female anaconda during an excursion! Special thanks to Mr. Chelm for sharing this video and his thoughts.

 

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It’s time to get into the spirit of the holiday season, and IE wants to give two lucky winners a special gift. We’re giving you one open-ended question and two chances to win the book Romancing the Rain — a photo journey into the heart of the Amazon rainforest.

Become an International Expeditions fan on Facebook or weigh-in via Twitter and finish this sentence:

I am thankful that travel _____________________

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The World Wildlife Fund and other experts say that the world's 3,200 wild tigers could become extinct in 12 years if countries fail to protect their habitats and step up the fight against poaching. It is estimated that just a century ago there were as many as 100,000 tigers in the wild. Three of the nine tiger subspecies — the Bali, Javan, and Caspian — already have become extinct in the past 70 years.