June 2010

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For weeks we’ve been following the oil spill’s impact on wildlife along the Gulf coast, but there is also an endangered species known to feed in the murky depths right where oil is leaking: sperm whales. Audubonmagazine.org reports that an estimated 1,665 sperm whales in the northern Gulf of Mexico that may be at risk as oil continues to spew from Deepwater Horizon.

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Avid traveler Wayne Zanardelli has chronicled his adventures to 83 countries in a series of more than 30 journals. Highlights of Mr. Zanardelli's travels include meeting the sons of both Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay; a private train trip between Beijing and Moscow; and sleeping in a tented oasis in Tunisia. Now Mr. Zanardelli shares journal excerpts from his Amazon River cruise with IE.

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Thanks to 11-year-old Sarah (pictured below with brother, Eli)  for sending in praise for her family Galapagos Islands cruise. We're happy to have shared the experience with such a young lover of wildlife!

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During the last century, Africa's black rhino population plummeted by more than 90 percent, reaching an alarming low of just 2,300, but five were recently returned to the Serengeti National Park as part of an ambitious initiative to boost the viability of Tanzania's rhino population.

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This is the second installment in a series by Wayne Zanardelli, an IE Guest who was kind enough to pass along observations about his latest Amazon cruise. Read Part I here.

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While it make take years to study the impact of the Gulf oil spill, in the middle of the Peruvian Amazon, thousands of miles from the BP rig, oil spills have been a fact of life for more than 30 years.

In villages like San Cristobal, the indigenous Achuar people believe their maladies are caused by exposure to oil. They suffer fainting spells, vomiting, chronic diarrhea, headaches and skin infections.

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials are planning an unprecedented relocation of 700-800 clutches of sea turtle eggs from beaches of Alabama and northwestern Florida to the Atlantic coast. The oil spill coincided with turtle breeding season. If allowed to hatch along the Gulf, the baby turtles would likely swim directly into the mass of crude oil spewing encroaching on Alabama and the Florida panhandle.

While nest have been relocated individually, relocation at this scale has never been attempted anywhere in the world.